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Title

Quantitative analysis of climate versus human impact on sediment yield since the Lateglacial: The Sarlieve palaeolake catchment (France)

Publication Year

2010

Author(s)
  • Macaire, Jean-Jacques
  • Fourmont, Agathe
  • Argant, Jacqueline
  • Breheret, Jean-Gabriel
  • Hinschberger, Florent
  • Trement, Frederic
Source
HOLOCENE Volume: 20 Issue: 4 Pages: 497-516 Published: 2010
ISSN
0959-6836
Abstract

Minimum rates of solid (SSY) and dissolved (DSY) sediment yield (SY) were evaluated in t/km (2) per yr from sediments stored in the Sarlieve palaeolake (French Massif Central) for seven phases of the Lateglacial and Holocene up to the seventeenth century. The catchment (29 km(2)), mainly formed of limestones and marls, is located in an area rich in archaeological sites in the Massif Central. The respective impacts of human activities and climate on SY were compared by quantification of human settlements through archaeological survey and palynological data. During the Lateglacial and early Holocene up to about 7500 yr cal. BP, variations in SSY and DSY rates were mainly related to climate change with higher rates during colder periods (Younger Dryas and Preboreal) and lower rates during warmer periods (Bolling-Allerod and Boreal). However, CF1 tephra fallout induced a sharp increase in SY during the Allerod. During the middle and late Holocene after 7500 yr cal. BP, SSY and DSY greatly increased (by factors of 6.5 and 2.8, respectively), particularly during the Final Neolithic at about 5300 yr cal. BP when the climate became cooler and more humid. After this date, at least 75% of the SSY increase and more than 90% of the DSY increase resulted from human activities, but SSY rates showed little variation during Protohistoric and Historic Times up to the seventeenth century. SSY and DSY rates and DSY/SSY ratio indicate that catchment soils began to form during the Lateglacial and Preboreal, thickened considerably during the Boreal and Atlantic, finally thinning (rejuvenation) mainly as the result of human-induced erosion during the sub-Boreal and sub-Atlantic. Increased mechanical erosion during the late Holocene also induced an increase in chemical erosion.

Author Keyword(s)
  • archaeological survey
  • climate-change impact
  • French Massif Central
  • Holocene
  • land-use impact
  • Lateglacial
  • palaeolake
  • soil erosion
  • solid and dissolved sediment yield
KeyWord(s) Plus
  • GREENLAND ICE-CORE
  • PUY-DE-DOME
  • RESTRICTED ENVIRONMENT
  • LACUSTRINE SEDIMENTS
  • HOLOCENE PERIODS
  • LAKE-SEDIMENTS
  • RIVER SEDIMENT
  • YOUNGER-DRYAS
  • DENUDATION
  • EROSION
ESI Discipline(s)
  • Environment/Ecology
  • Geosciences
Web of Science Category(ies)
  • Geography, Physical
  • Geosciences, Multidisciplinary
Adress(es)

[Macaire, Jean-Jacques] Univ Orleans, Univ Tours, Fac Sci & Tech, UMR ISTO 6113,INSU,CNRS, F-37200 Tours, France; [Argant, Jacqueline] Univ Lyon 1, UMR 6636, F-69622 Villeurbanne, France; [Trement, Frederic] Univ Clermont Ferrand, EA 1001, F-63006 Clermont Ferrand, France

Reprint Adress

Macaire, JJ (reprint author), Univ Orleans, Univ Tours, Fac Sci & Tech, UMR ISTO 6113,INSU,CNRS, Ave Monge, F-37200 Tours, France.

Country(ies)
  • France
CNRS - Adress(es)
  • Institut des Sciences de la Terre d'Orléans (ISTO), UMR6113
  • Laboratoire méditerranéen de préhistoire Europe-Afrique (LAMPEA), UMR6636
Accession Number
WOS:000278435600002
uid:/VWXCDM22
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