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Title

Enhanced chemical weathering as a geoengineering strategy to reduce atmospheric carbon dioxide, supply nutrients, and mitigate ocean acidification

Publication Year

2013

Author(s)
  • Hartmann, Jens
  • West, A. Joshua
  • Renforth, Phil
  • Koehler, Peter
  • De La Rocha, Christina L.
  • Wolf-Gladrow, Dieter A.
  • Duerr, Hans H.
  • Scheffran, Juergen
Source
REVIEWS OF GEOPHYSICS Volume: 51 Issue: 2 Pages: 113-149 Published: 2013
ISSN
8755-1209 eISSN: 1944-9208
Abstract

Chemical weathering is an integral part of both the rock and carbon cycles and is being affected by changes in land use, particularly as a result of agricultural practices such as tilling, mineral fertilization, or liming to adjust soil pH. (2) from the atmosphere. (2) to bicarbonate, increasing the alkalinity and pH of natural waters. Some products of mineral dissolution would precipitate in soils or be taken up by ecosystems, but a significant portion would be transported to the coastal zone and the open ocean, where the increase in alkalinity would partially counteract ocean acidification associated with the current marked increase in atmospheric CO2. Other elements released during this mineral dissolution, like Si, P, or K, could stimulate biological productivity, further helping to remove CO2 from the atmosphere. On land, the terrestrial carbon pool would likely increase in response to Enhanced Weathering in areas where ecosystem growth rates are currently limited by one of the nutrients that would be released during mineral dissolution. In the ocean, the biological carbon pumps (which export organic matter and CaCO3 to the deep ocean) may be altered by the resulting influx of nutrients and alkalinity to the ocean. This review merges current interdisciplinary knowledge about Enhanced Weathering, the processes involved, and the applicability as well as some of the consequences and risks of applying the method.

Author Keyword(s)
  • enhanced weathering
  • climate change
  • global biogeochemical cycles
  • geoengineering
  • carbon
  • silicate
KeyWord(s) Plus
  • BIOGENIC SILICA DISSOLUTION
  • SUSTAINABLE RICE PRODUCTION
  • TROPICAL RAIN-FOREST
  • SOIL ORGANIC-CARBON
  • CALCIUM SILICATE
  • ROCK POWDERS
  • MINERAL CARBONATION
  • CO2 SEQUESTRATION
  • DISSOLVED SILICON
  • MISSISSIPPI RIVER
ESI Discipline(s)
  • Geosciences
Web of Science Category(ies)
  • Geochemistry & Geophysics
Adress(es)

[Hartmann, Jens] Univ Hamburg, Inst Biogeochem & Marine Chem, D-20146 Hamburg, Germany; [West, A. Joshua] Univ So Calif, Dept Earth Sci, Los Angeles, CA USA; [Renforth, Phil] Univ Oxford, Dept Earth Sci, Oxford OX1 3PR, England; [Koehler, Peter; Wolf-Gladrow, Dieter A.] Helmholtz Ctr Polar & Marine Res AWI, Alfred Wegener Inst, Bremerhaven, Germany; [De La Rocha, Christina L.] Univ Bretagne Occidentale, Inst Univ Europeen Mer, CNRS, UMR 6539, Plouzane, France; [Duerr, Hans H.] Univ Waterloo, Dept Earth & Environm Sci, Ecohydrol Res Grp, Waterloo, ON N2L 3G1, Canada; [Scheffran, Juergen] Univ Hamburg, Inst Geog, D-20146 Hamburg, Germany

Reprint Adress

Hartmann, J (reprint author), Univ Hamburg, Inst Biogeochem & Marine Chem, KlimaCampus,Bundesstr 55, D-20146 Hamburg, Germany.

Country(ies)
  • Canada
  • France
  • Germany
  • United Kingdom
  • United States
CNRS - Adress(es)
  • Laboratoire des sciences de l'environnement marin (LEMAR), UMR6539
Accession Number
WOS:000323230100001
uid:/LF9HWW6D
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