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Title

Mesocosm Experiments as a Tool for Ecological Climate-Change Research

Publication Year

2013

Author(s)
  • Stewart, Rebecca I. A.
  • Dossena, Matteo
  • Bohan, David A.
  • Jeppesen, Erik
  • Kordas, Rebecca L.
  • Ledger, Mark E.
  • Meerhoff, Mariana
  • Moss, Brian
  • Mulder, Christian
  • Shurin, Jonathan B.
  • Suttle, Blake
  • Thompson, Ross
  • Trimmer, Mark
  • Woodward, Guy
Source
ADVANCES IN ECOLOGICAL RESEARCH, VOL 48: GLOBAL CHANGE IN MULTISPECIES SYSTEMS, PT 3 Bokk Series: Advances in Ecological Research Volume: 48 Pages: 71-181 Published: 2013
ISSN
0065-2504
Abstract

Predicting the ecological causes and consequences of global climate change requires a variety of approaches, including the use of experiments, models, and surveys. Among experiments, mesocosms have become increasingly popular because they provide an important bridge between smaller, more tightly controlled, microcosm experiments (which can suffer from limited realism) and the greater biological complexity of natural systems (in which mechanistic relationships often cannot be identified). A new evaluation of the contribution of the mesocosm approach, its potential for future research, as well as its limitations, is timely. As part of this review, we constructed a new database of over 250 post-1990 studies that have explored different components of climate change across a range of organisational levels, scales, and habitats. Issues related to realism, reproducibility and control are assessed in marine, freshwater, and terrestrial systems. Some general patterns emerged, particularly at the ecosystem level, such as consistent and predictable effects on whole-system respiration rates. There are, however, also many seemingly idiosyncratic, contingent responses, especially at the community level, both within and among habitat types. These similarities and differences in both the drivers and responses highlight the need for caution before making generalisations. Finally, we assess future directions and prospects for new methodological advances and the need for greater international coordination and interdisciplinarity.

Author Keyword(s)
    KeyWord(s) Plus
    • TEMPERATURE-SIZE RULE
    • FOOD-WEB STRUCTURE
    • CONTINENTAL-SCALE PATTERNS
    • ECO-EVOLUTIONARY DYNAMICS
    • FRESH-WATER MICROCOSMS
    • SAFE OPERATING SPACE
    • GLOBAL CARBON-CYCLE
    • SHALLOW LAKES
    • OCEAN ACIDIFICATION
    • BODY-SIZE
    ESI Discipline(s)
    • Environment/Ecology
    Web of Science Category(ies)
    • Ecology
    Adress(es)

    [Stewart, Rebecca I. A.; Dossena, Matteo; Trimmer, Mark] Queen Mary Univ London, Sch Biol & Chem Sci, London, England; [Bohan, David A.] INRA, UMR 1347, Agroecol ECOLDUR, F-21034 Dijon, France; [Jeppesen, Erik; Meerhoff, Mariana] Aarhus Univ, Dept Biosci, Aarhus, Denmark; [Kordas, Rebecca L.] Univ British Columbia, Dept Zool, Vancouver, BC, Canada; [Ledger, Mark E.] Univ Birmingham, Sch Geog Earth & Environm Sci, Birmingham, W Midlands, England; [Meerhoff, Mariana] Univ Republ, CURE Fac Ciencias, Dept Ecol & Evoluc, Maldonado, Uruguay; [Moss, Brian] Univ Liverpool, Sch Environm Sci, Liverpool L69 3BX, Merseyside, England; [Mulder, Christian] Natl Inst Publ Hlth & Environm RIVM DMG, Bilthoven, Netherlands; [Suttle, Blake; Woodward, Guy] Imperial Coll London, Ascot, Berks, England; [Thompson, Ross] Univ Canberra, Inst Appl Ecol, Canberra, ACT 2601, Australia; [Shurin, Jonathan B.] Univ Calif San Diego, Sect Ecol Behav & Evolut, San Diego, CA 92103 USA

    Reprint Adress

    Dossena, M (reprint author), Queen Mary Univ London, Sch Biol & Chem Sci, London, England.

    Country(ies)
    • Australia
    • Canada
    • Denmark
    • France
    • Netherlands
    • United Kingdom
    • United States
    • Uruguay
    CNRS - Adress(es)
      Accession Number
      WOS:000326098900003
      uid:/4R772VXS
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